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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
feet higher than the water level was with irene, august a year ago. we're staying hunkered down and bringing pictures the best we can. >> we appreciate that, mike, i don't have to tell you the real estate there is hugely valuable for the state of new jersey. it is a recreational playground all summer for millions of american families. what is high tide where you are? is this the after-effect of the mean high tide on the jersey shore? >> reporter: yeah, the high tide is occurring right about now. it ranges generally between 8-8:30 between atlantic city and up here. so it is occurring right now. so we would suspect, now that the storm has gone inland, and the winds generally -- eventually will come around offshore, that it won't get much worse than this. the water won't get much higher. but again, it is already two and a half to three feet higher, at least at sandy hook than it was with irene. so that puts that in perspective. and i think when we get first flight tomorrow you will see how the entire coastline has been re-arranged from the entire storm. >> i think my wife and i had
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
lessons from the last storm. >> reporter: connecticut is one of 13 states haunted by last year's irene, and the nearly 16 billion in damage, leaving thousands without power for days. then hit by a surprising snowstorm on halloween. today, governor malloy warned it could be the type of storm not seen in 30 years. >> have enough food and water for everyone in your household. assume there will be an elongated period of time in which you will be without energy. >> reporter: at the massachusetts store? power supplies were hot items. >> i have generators, make sure we have oil, flash lights, got to be prepared. >> reporter: storm surge is another worry, with a full moon, sunday night being a difficult combination, it sent the area in norfolk, virginia, out to sea. others sought safe harbor. and along the new jersey shore, these people sought safe harbor >> i may as well take the right steps, get the boat out of the way. whatever is going to happen will happen >> reporter: this boat yard couldn't keep up with requests. >> no, i'm sorry, we can't take boats out of the water. >> reporter: they'
larger than anything we have experienced most recently, like irene. richard? >> erica, keep it safe out there. >>> today people living in the district can pick up sandbags to protect their homes from flooding. d.c.'s department of public works will hand out sandbags at the tacoma park center. d.c. residents can stop by from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to pick up their sandbags. there is a five-bag limit per car. >>> throughout our area people are preparing for the worst, not only stocking up for the possibility of long power outages but in some neighborhoods they're bracing for flooding. news 4's jackie bensen reports. >> reporter: in the huntington section of fairfax county it's a tense game of watching and waiting. this flyer was hand delivered to every home in the area which has been devastated regularly by flooding, warning residents to be prepared. as recently as august, residents of this neighborhood were pumping water out of their basements. >> we've been preparing for a couple days. >> reporter: at twins ace hardware store on main street in fairfax, you can tell what people need by
is on script. and that is that this afternoon's tide will be as bad as the perfect storm '92/irene of last year. and that tonight's tide, along with the entirety of long island sound on our side, could be catastrophic. that's what we're planning for. we hope it's avoided somehow and some way, but if you look at all the surge maps, it's connecticut that will be most adversely impacted. >> yeah. and you know what? i covered connecticut for quite some time many years ago. and there are neighborhoods on the coastline that get flooded during a thunderstorm. >> yeah. >> how are you going to keep homes from getting decimated up and down the connecticut coastline if. >> listen, we've ordered evacuations or suggested ev evacuations that affect 362,000 people, one out of every ten residents of the state of connecticut. but it's the small towns and it's the big cities. it's new haven, bridge fort, stamford, norwalk, fairfield, they're all going to be adversely impacted. we're waiting to see. if this hits 11 feet with waves on top of 11 feet, we're talking about dike systems being overrun. that's the sever
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
shore. >> reporter: well, the fear is it's obviously going to be worse than irene because this storm is tracking to our south. it's going to go inland south of here. so that's going to pile the water up from now, from yesterday through today into tonight. and until the storm goes by us and gets past us on our longitude, then the winds will come back around. and that will be an offshore component of the wind. but that's not going to happen until sometime tomorrow. so in the meantime, the tide right now is trying to go out. it's not having much luck because the wind is blowing in from the northeast at 30 to 35 miles an hour. we're getting some gusts 45 miles an hour. but the worst of the storm is a long way away. we're still more than 40 # 0 miles away. when it comes in, as it gets closer, we'll have gusts as high as hurricane force. once those winds kick up over 60, you'll see the power outages ramping up exponentially. again, the high tide tonight, 8:00 to 8:30 up and down the shore. and that could be coincidental with the landfall, plus we have the full moon, the astronomical effect
with these winds. i was out on the beach with irene for over 12 hours and this is about when i felt it. this storm is still a couple hundred miles away and the winds are gusting over 50 miles per hour. the highest surge will come in at about later this evening and go through this evening we will see the surge 6 to 8 feet. look at the atlantic. it is just ramped up, 10 to 12 footers out there. this is low tide. normally on a typical day you would have 150 feet of beach. it's all gone. and as that next high tide comes in we're going to see the worst of the beach erosion, coastal damage. this whole beach area will be rearranged. so far no reports of any significant damage, but some of the areas south of here, the dunes have been eaten by the wave action and some of the local authorities think some of those homes are going to be hit and fall into the atlantic later on tonight. so, it's only going to get worse from here and inland when these winds crank up over 60 hils per hour, d.c., baltimore, philly away from the beaches this afternoon and tonight that's going to shut down power to millions. once we
's all said and done, the total $20 billion or more. exceeding the damage certainly from irene last year which was about 12 to $16 billion. meantime moody's an lytics estimate economic losses will total $10 billion a day, lost wages, production, sales for businesses. do you think that estimate is on target? >> yeah, i think that estimate is on target but i believe moody's said they're not going to alter their estimate for gdp in the fourth quarter because some of this will be made up and also some of this stuff that gets destroyed you have to put people to work to rebuild it. that actually adds to gross domestic product. it subtracts from the net but adds to the growth. >> one thing i'm being told in my ear, we have an updated death toll i want to pass along to everyone. we now have 27 -- 29, excuse me, 29 confirmed deaths. again, we started this hour it was 18. so the numbers are fluid and moving up rapidly, at least over the last hour that we've seen so far. one thing -- jared, go ahead. >> terrible devastation as you've been reporting all hour. one thing to consider is that insurance
people, customers, without power in new jersey now as after hurricane irene a year ago and gives you a sense of the depth of the problem here. 60% of the state does not have power. and again, it's going to take a while. yes, there is some frustration but i think people are understanding that this is a really severe calamity that hit this place and you can see along the jersey shore places like this, a beach front property, a restaurant obliterated and what president obama and governor christie are seeing as they fly up and down the shoreline. we saw marine one go by in a convoy with helicopters about ten minutes ago and making their rounds. but i don't think a lot of people expect a lot from the federal government in the short term. >> yeah. >> right now people are just trying to deal with their immediate needs, moving in with neighbors, staying with friends. we have heard reports that some utility companies are talking about perhaps turning off water services, for example, because there could be contamination in the system. people are hunkering down and the work is just beginning. i
thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> we actually got engaged here last year and the storm came in and we had to leave early and now we're here. we got married, on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. >> isn't it good luck though to rain on your wedding day? if you can find the silver lining and try to tie that in. >> we'll check back in with them in a couple years. see how they're doing. >>> coming up on news 4 today a holiday hallmark. a rush to give the national christmas tree its debut before sandy steals the show. >>> protecting your property from flooding. liz crenshaw shares some do it yourself projects you can do now before the storm. >>> remember, storm team 4 is tracking the hurricane sandy on air and online. sign up for breaking news alerts on nbc washington.com. also follow us on facebook and >>> take a look at sandy. the system is now a tropical storm but still has the potential to regain its hurricane status as it inches up the east coast and of course everyone around here and all across the easte
outages. they had hundreds of thousands of people without power during irene last year. they expect the same this year, probably even worse. they are thinking maybe as many as 600,000 without power for days to come. again the surge is really going to be problem here. we'll see that later in the evening and into tomorrow. matt? >> we spoke to connecticut's governor daniel malloy earlier this morning. he said this storm is one of the biggest threats to human life in his state in years. i began by asking governor malloy what worries him specifically about sandy. >> it's the next two tides. could experience tides this afternoon at about what the perfect storm was. tonight's tide during the nighttime hours could be twice that, and that's our biggest worry. if that happens it really is catastrophic. the amount of damage and loss of property is going to be extreme. we've been talking about it for days. we've prepared. we have people trying places. we have equipment in the right places. really we're waiting to see what mother nature throws at us. let's be clear. this storm is staying on scr
they know the drill. thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> w actually got engaged here last year. and the storm came in last year. we had to leave early. now we're here. we got married on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> some luck. so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. our own erika gonzalez is in rehoboth and caught up with the "today" show's al roker who says sandy is a storm we'll be talking about for a while. >> you have to be prepared for a lot of rain and you have to be prepared for a lot of wind. i think you got to be prepared for a storm surge and if you're not along the coast don't think you're out of the woods either because, you know, the parts of inland maryland, virginia, pennsylvania, all going to see effects from this. so i think this is a storm that could be really one we'll be talking about for years to come. >> next the arrangements you may want to make now. >> we'll also take your questions on facebook and twitter. send them to us right now. use the hash tag sandy d.c. we'll try to get to as many as possible. >> storm team 4 i
in that state. that is twice the number that were without power after hurricane irene. so a serious situation in the state of new jersey. savannah. >> all right. >>> from new jersey to connecticut, the governor there is calling the storm the worst water event in his state's history. thousands of homeowners trapped by coastal flooding. nbc's katie in connecticut this morning. katie, good morning to you. >> reporter: certainly one of the worst water events in history. now it's going to go down as one of the worse power events. take a look at what's going on here in stonington. this tree is about 80 feet tall. i'm about 5'2", 5'3". ripped out from its roots about 5:00 last night, and thrown on to, luckily, the powerlines here, which are basically cradling this tree right now. this house was saved by those power lineses. you are seeing this seen up and down connecticut as we speak. trees that are down, taking down power lines, and damaging a number of houses. that's what is causing a lot of the outages. there was massive flooding as well last night. high tide here in stonington was around 9:30 la
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toé@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
it gets inland, this is not just a coastal event. it's an inland event as well. tropical storm irene caused more damage inland. this system could dump up to a foot of snow. parts of west virginia, ohio, on into pennsylvania. so andrea, this one is going to be a massive, massive problem probably for days to come. >> all right, al. thank you, and stay safe. dylan dreyer will be here with the rest of the nation's forecast in just a few minutes. >>> hurricane sandy is already impacting the race for the white house. mitt romney and vice president joe biden each cancelled planned weekend appearances in virginia. ron mott is in ohio, he's traveling with vice presidential candidate paul ryan. ron, good morning. >> reporter: it takes 270 electoral votes to win the white house. 18 votes are up for grabs in ohio and they just may be the most important votes of all. along with the weather churning over the atlanta, president obama and mitt romney are whipping up a storm of their own, a campaign blizzard. >> thank you so much! >> reporter: as election day looms just ten days away. friday, a day a
irene. the strongest winds may be 100 to 150 miles north. southern jersey, delaware, maryland, the highest winds maybe up there in connecticut and new york city. it's a big, broad storm. that's the most important thing. and if you're north of that center, we have big issues and big concerns with storm surge and coastal flooding. that will probably be the epic ending to this storm. that's probably what everyone will remember is what happens to the beaches in new jersey, possibly connecticut, rhode island and long island if the storm does come ashore down there in southern jersey. all of these little lines are possible paths. we still haven't ruled out a direct impact into areas of new england either. there's still some questions to be answered. the bottom line is starting on sunday afternoon and evening, mid-atlantic and northeast, it's too late to prepare. you have today, you have tomorrow and then be prepared to stay in your house with your family and kids. most of monday and maybe even into tuesday. i'll have updates throughout the show here. stay tuned. new york city, sunri
million more than we had in irene. >> wow. >> so it is -- it is a completely devastating storm from that perspective. and i think what we're going to find, unfortunately, when we get to the jersey shore today is just total devastation. >> yeah. >> and that's the real concern. because not only is it people's homes and private property, but also you have the tourism industry in new jersey which is one of our biggest industries. we're going to have to work hard to make sure we're ready for next summer at the jersey shore. >> governor chris christie, our prayers are with the state of new jersey this morning. thank you very much. >> thank you, governor, good luck. >> mika, joe, mike, willie, thank you all you guys, appreciate it. >>> coming up in minutes, author of the best-selling book "the perfect storm" and "war," we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. on ga
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)